City rates, but country services

There are some things we know we have made a choice to ‘forego’ by living in a rural setting, such as being near big supermarkets, having public transport, etc.

PIC OF THE WEEK: Fire & Rescue Commissioner Paul Baxter poses for a photograph with members of Braidwood Station 263, October 3. Photo: Tim Wimborne

PIC OF THE WEEK: Fire & Rescue Commissioner Paul Baxter poses for a photograph with members of Braidwood Station 263, October 3. Photo: Tim Wimborne

Those things, you would know whether they are available where you are wanting to live, or how far away they are (you would think you’d do some research).

But other things – such as sub-standard infrastructure (roads, footpaths, etc) – should not be let go just because of where we are.

We can’t all live in the city, or don’t want to, and if everyone from rural areas moved to have the handiness of the city life, the cities wouldn’t cope with the influx.

Not only that, you can’t have a farm in the city to provide meat, dairy and other agriculture, so people need to live in the country. 

We make a choice of living away from the city lifestyle, yes, but we shouldn’t have to put up with being last for funding or upgrades, etc.

Kristelle Mann via Facebook

If we don’t get the same services, why are our rates the same as the city.

I am arguing with QPRC as they charged every resident $391 on their rates for a waste program charge.

They said it was to cover Chemical Clean Up Day and Clean Up Australia Day, tip reclamation and roadside clean-ups. Both clean-up days are ‘free’, I pay to use a tip, and they have never cleaned up my road.

Megan Williams via Facebook

Don’t trust Google Maps

You need look no further for another example than to ask Google for directions to Braidwood. Leads you to a paddock 250 metres north-east of the northern end of Wallace Street.

David Burns via Facebook